5 Friends ‘Like’ Your Kidney Donation

May 9, 2012 by  
Filed under Blog

Whenever Facebook says there’s a ‘big announcement’ in the works, the social media world grinds to a halt with bated, anticipatory breath and the recent announcement was a bit of a doozy. Facebook have announced that it will allow its 900 million members to share their organ donation status with their connected friends and family. Users who intend to make their donor status visible will then be linked to a database where users in need of organs can ‘find’ a donor.

It’s a very noble, humanitarian tactic by Facebook yet for some, it may be met with even more scepticism around privacy concerns. Pessimistic? Perhaps, but you can’t be too careful these days. It’s been well reported that frustrations are abound when it comes to Facebook’s Machiavelian approach to privacy and perhaps this announcement is one more step in that direction.

For those unperturbed by this knowledge share, you can follow the below steps to update your own organ donation status from Facebook Timeline:

1)      Go to your profile.

2)      Click Life Event.

3)      Scroll down to the Health & Wellness section.

4)      Click Organ donor and type your state information and date you became a donor. If you’re not officially registered, click on the link that will take you to the state agency responsible for such information.

Voila!

By Koby Geddes.

  • http://twitter.com/gosstronomy Michael Shafran

    I don’t think there’s anything Machiavellian about this initiative (other FB approaches are fair game, of course). The main direction seems to be driving people to their donor registration agencies, which is an important choice for each of us to make. There are too many people out there in desperate need of organ transplants, so it’s a poor choice to selfishly think of our own privacy. Who’s going to care if you’ve decided to donate all of your organs? This is a case where, when it comes to “privacy” concerns, it’s better to err in favour of fulfilling a crucial need for people whose very lives depend on it.

  • Koby Geddes

    Hi
    Michael, thanks so much for the comment. Definitely agree with you that there’s
    nothing Machiavellian about this particular initiative – this is addressing
    previous concerns of information sharing with brands etc. We see a lot of news
    and blog coverage about concerns around Facebook’s security and – especially
    for some of the more backward thinking sensationalists – the idea of sharing
    donor status with a platform that someone may already has a suspicious relationship
    with may not necessarily rub them the right way. Silly though, we should all be
    donating.